Tag Archives: old

Roger Dörig – Appenzeller Gürtel / belt

Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel - Belt Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1 Roger Dörig - Appenzeller Gürtel1

Roger Dörig Sennsattler – Appenzeller Gürtel – Belt:
If you ever cross the border from Germany to Austria and over to Switzerland, called the Dreiländereck, you have to see the workshop of Roger Dörig a Sennsattler. His workshop is over 125 years old which he runs now in the 4th generation. A Sennsattler is a mix of a saddler and a goldsmith. Most famous for the special Appenzeller Gürtel / Appenzeller belts. Every item on the belts are sawed out from a piece of metal and later on engraved by hand and carefully attached with small rivets to the belt.

I´ve been in his workshop about 3 years ago and promised to come back to get a customized belt done by Roger Dörig. A great surprise to see one of his belts in the legacy of my father. Which he wore fore at least a decade and guess what, i will hopefully do this as well for some more.

Have a look at Roger Dörig´s workshop and a video of him showing his profession and passion.  (in swiss german – hard to understand if you are not swiss or from the border area to switzerland).

Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214

Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214 Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214

Rowenta art deco chrome toaster E 5214:
A trust worthfull breakfast friend, works always.  Sometimes to well if you get distracted and forget to turn the slices. An all time classic in use for decades and a fine example of engineering and design ment to last. Rare to find but possible, check Ebay for Rowenta E 5214. If the slices are not too light or sticky they will turn by itself by 180 degree when you open a door, which is a nice stunt. Check a video here made by HausfrauJournal.

My old Zippo – Popeye feinschmucked

Old Popeye Zippo by feinschmuck - solid brass Old Popeye Zippo by feinschmuck1 Old Popeye Zippo by feinschmuck

My old Zippo – Popeye feinschmucked:
This is the prototype for the Popeye Zippo upgraded by Feinschmuck, and distributed via Amtraq. My old Zippo from April 1993 (D IX, here the dating codes) in solid brass and brushed surface. The distributed ones will look like this.

munich coat of arms belt – Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel

Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel - city arms munich belt1 Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel - city arms munich belt münchner kindl Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel - city arms munich belt münchner kindlMünchner Wappen Gürtel – Munich coat of  arms belt – Münchner Kindl:
Yesterday Manfred from Feinschmuck gave me this belt buckle made after a 13th. century coat of arms (Stadtwappen / Stadtsiegel) from the city of Munich. 

Can someone make out the full text on the buckle and figure out the meaning?

Below something from Wikipedia the full story here: Münchner Kindl.

The coat of arms of Munich (Münchner Wappen) depicts a young monk dressed in black holding a red book. It has existed in a similar form since the 13th century, though at certain points in its history it has not depicted the central figure of the monk at all. As the German name for Munich, i.e. München, means of Monks, the monk in this case is a self-explanatory symbol who represents the city of Munich. Appearing on a document of May 28, 1239, the oldest seal of Munich has a picture of a monk wearing an open hood. While all seal impressions show the monk with the book in one hand and three outstretched fingers in the other, the monk has varied slightly, appearing in profile, then later full-faced and bare-headed. By the 19th century the figure was portrayed as youthful and became known as the Münchner Kindl or Munich Child. The coat of arms in its current form was created in 1957 and is still an important symbol of the Bavarian state capital.