Tag Archives: buckle

Rider Belts – Reiter Gürtel

Riders Belt - Reiter Gürtel Snaffle Bit Wasser Trense Messing Riders Belt - Reiter Gürtel Snaffle Bit Wasser Trense Messing Brass Horseshoe Hufeisen Messing Belt hand sewn Brass Horseshoe Hufeisen Messing Belt hand sewn

Rider Belts – Reiter Gürtel

It was just a matter of time with so many riding family members and that I had to do a Riders Belt – Reiter Gürtel. So that is what i came up with. A mouthpiece / snaffle bit belt best for slim belts of 25mm and a horseshoe belt with 38mm. Both buckles are UK made and massive brass casted. Hand sewn in saddle stitch on veg. tanned leather from a german tannery.

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Robert Crumb – 70th Birthday belt – Squirrely

Robert Crumb squirrely the squirrel belt by feinschmuckRobert Crumb – Squirrely the Squirrel belt by feinschmuck:
Robert Crumb has got his 70th birthday
by most of us known by “Felix the cat”. Manfred a big fan of Robert Crumb designed a belt buckle as a present. He will see him in France and will give him the Squirrely the Squirrel belt by Feinschmuck.
Squirrely the Squirrel
probably the meanest character of comic ever drawn to paper check a sample here.

munich coat of arms belt – Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel

Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel - city arms munich belt1 Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel - city arms munich belt münchner kindl Münchner Stadtwappen Gürtel - city arms munich belt münchner kindlMünchner Wappen Gürtel – Munich coat of  arms belt – Münchner Kindl:
Yesterday Manfred from Feinschmuck gave me this belt buckle made after a 13th. century coat of arms (Stadtwappen / Stadtsiegel) from the city of Munich. 

Can someone make out the full text on the buckle and figure out the meaning?

Below something from Wikipedia the full story here: Münchner Kindl.

The coat of arms of Munich (Münchner Wappen) depicts a young monk dressed in black holding a red book. It has existed in a similar form since the 13th century, though at certain points in its history it has not depicted the central figure of the monk at all. As the German name for Munich, i.e. München, means of Monks, the monk in this case is a self-explanatory symbol who represents the city of Munich. Appearing on a document of May 28, 1239, the oldest seal of Munich has a picture of a monk wearing an open hood. While all seal impressions show the monk with the book in one hand and three outstretched fingers in the other, the monk has varied slightly, appearing in profile, then later full-faced and bare-headed. By the 19th century the figure was portrayed as youthful and became known as the Münchner Kindl or Munich Child. The coat of arms in its current form was created in 1957 and is still an important symbol of the Bavarian state capital.